Thermo Fisher Scientific launches new panel for forensic DNA analysis

Scientific Company News

Thermo Fisher Scientific has announced the launch of its new Precision ID GlobalFiler NGS STR Panel v2 for forensic DNA analysis.

This next-generation sequencing STR panel combines the functionality of the Applied Biosystems Precision ID GlobalFiler NGS STR Panel v2 with that of the Converge Software 2.0 solution, and is designed to retrieve more information from mixed, degraded or limited DNA samples.

“Thermo Fisher Scientific has launched a new next-generation sequencing STR panel to help retrieve information from degraded DNA samples.“

It works seamlessly with the Ion Chef System for automated library and template preparation and sequencing on the Ion S5 and Ion S5 XL Systems, meaning sequencing runs can be completed in around two hours, with only 15 minutes of hands-on time.

The panel targets CODIS expanded core loci, with additional multi-allelic STR markers, including Penta D and Penta E, as well as sex determination markers. This facilitates mixture resolution for identifying multiple contributors in complex casework samples.

Rosy Lee, vice-president and general manager of human identification at Thermo Fisher Scientific, said: "Our customers need more access to genetic identification profiles from complex DNA samples, prompting the continued development of the Precision ID NGS System, additional panels and a more comprehensive data analysis pipeline."

Currently, factors such as DNA degradation, mixtures or insufficient starting material prevent an estimated 30 to 40 percent of samples from offering conclusive results, but this panel will help to address many of these problems.

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