Research into medical uses of graphene and nanomaterials receives funding

Engineering

New biomedical applications for graphene and other nanomaterials are to be studied by the University of Manchester with the aid of government funding.

A 5.2 million pound grant has been provided by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council for a new project that aims to further explore how two-dimensional materials can address major health challenges such as cancer, diabetes and dementia.

“The University of Manchester has been awarded more than five million pounds to fund research into the use of nanomaterials such as graphene in the human body.“

The team will look at how graphene and other 2D materials could be used to create targeted drug delivery systems to attack cancer cells while leaving other cells unharmed, as well as how they can aid the remote electrical stimulation of nerves affected by neurodegenerative diseases, or smart wound dressings to aid faster healing and reduced damage to tissue.

Four major healthcare partners are also part of the project, while two specialist graphene companies, Versarien and Graphenea, will provide materials and industrial upscale expertise.

Research leader Professor Kostas Kostarelos said: "We are all looking forward to developing a thorough and systematic understanding of the true capabilities graphene and 2D materials offer in solving current clinical challenges."

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