Nuclear Reactor Uses Molten Salt to Function

Service Engineering

A nuclear reactor that employs molten salt has been created by the MoltexFLEX team in Warrington. According to MoltexFLEX, the FLEX reactor is straightforward in aesthetics and function because it does not contain any moving components. By 2029, they hope to have the first reactor up and running.

Moltex has boasted that the reactor can adapt to variations in energy demand by swiftly resuming full power or immediately entering an idle mode; a 500 MW power plant could also be built in just one year.

“the FLEX reactor is straightforward in aesthetics and function because it does not contain any moving components. By 2029, they hope to have the first reactor up and running“

MoltexFLEX’s Chief Executive Officer, David Landon, commented: “we recognised the need for an energy supply that can support renewables when the sun doesn’t shine or the wind doesn’t blow. In the FLEX reactor, we have a solution for consumers and countries alike.”

The cost of power produced by the FLEX reactor will only be £40 each megawatt hour, the most similar equivalent to that being wind energy. The nuclear device has patented technology with two molten salts, one used as a coolant and the other used as a fuel. This innovation eliminates the requirement for pumps by having any heat from the reactor being removed by convection.

The FLEX reactor's design means that it doesn't need traditional steel and concrete infrastructure, significantly lowering expense associated with running and maintaining it. Once operational, it can run with the same expertise and machinery used in a fossil fuel plant, functioning for 6 decades and stopping for just 2 brief periods to allow refuelling.

David Landon continued: “The FLEX reactor provides the safety net of affordable domestic energy but is versatile enough for applications ranging from decarbonising heavy industry to powering cargo ships.”

The reactor's 750°C heat output might potentially be utilised to create hydrogen more effectively and desalinate water. A single reactor has the capacity to provide electricity for 40,000 households.

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