New study trialling the effectiveness of aspirin in treatment for breast cancer

Science

A new study is looking into the effects of using aspirin together with immunotherapy drug avelumab for individuals impacted by breast cancer. It has been revealed that this combination could possibly prevent deaths as a result of Cancer.

Financial backing for the clinical trial will come from the Breast Cancer Now Catalyst Programme. Pfizer has subsidised the research and allowed the charity’s researchers to use numerous Pfizer medicines.

“studies for people who have 18 types of cancers demonstrated that those who took aspirin for reasons unrelated to their cancer had 20% more chance of surviving “

On the condition that the clinical trial proves a success, desperately needed new treatment options could be available to the 8,000 women every year in the UK who live with triple negative breast cancer. This is rarer, and frequently more destructive breast cancer variant, overwhelmingly impacts younger women and black women.

Pairing these 2 drugs together has previously been seen to aid in controlling the growth of tumours in mice. It has actually been more effective than immunotherapy drugs used by themselves, therefore a greater number of patients could gain from this treatment.

118 available observational studies for people who have 18 types of cancers demonstrated that those who took aspirin for reasons unrelated to their cancer had 20% more chance of surviving.

Consultant Medical Oncologist, Dr Anne Armstrong, said, “Not all breast cancers respond well to immunotherapy. Our earlier research has suggested that aspirin can make certain types of immunotherapy more effective by preventing the cancer from making substances that weaken the immune response. Anti-inflammatory drugs like aspirin could hold the key to increasing the effectiveness of immunotherapy when used at the same time.”

Director of Research, Support and Influencing at Breast Cancer Now, Dr Simon Vincent, commented that “The 8,000 women diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer in the UK each year face the frightening reality of limited treatment options – we urgently need to address this.”

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