casing graphene with bactericidal molecules has potential to prevent medical implant infections

Service Engineering

Swedish researchers have discovered a way to prevent bacterial infections on medical implants. This is done by casing a graphene material with bactericidal molecules.

There are particular types of bacteria are able to form impermeable biofilms on surgical implants. These Biofilms are considerably more resilient compared to other bacteria, making infections hard to treat. This may result in patients experiencing pain and can even call for expensive implant replacements.

“Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have been successful in binding water-insoluble antibacterial molecules to graphene“

There are solutions available, with numerous hydrophobic drugs and molecules with antibacterial features. However, these drugs and molecules are only able to be used in the body if they are adhered to a material, something that is relatively hard to manufacture.

Author of the study and researcher at Chalmers’ Department of Biology and Biological Engineering, Santosh Pandit, said that Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have been successful in binding water-insoluble antibacterial molecules to graphene. They have also achieved in making molecules release from the material in a “controlled, continuous” way, which has been described by Pandit as an important prerequisite, with a chance for simple incorporation into industrial developments.

Santosh Pandit said, “Graphene offers great potential here for interaction with hydrophobic molecules or drugs, and when we created our new material, we made use of these properties. The process of binding the antibacterial molecules takes place with the help of ultrasound.”

Researchers are effectively adding usnic acid into the surface of the graphene material and avoiding development of biofilms on the surface. Mr Pandit claimed this may be a jumping off point for better antibacterial fortification of future biomedical products, saying that the team is scheduling research trials to look into attaching additional hydrophobic molecules and drugs with a larger potential to medicate or avert a range of clinical infections.

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