Virtual Conference set to Explore Global Animal-Assisted Interventions Developments and Practices

Animal Health

The Society for Companion Animal Studies (SCAS) is delighted to announce that its 2020 conference ‘Human and Animal Welfare in AAI: Learnings from the UK and across the globe’ will take place this year online, and is now open for registration.

The decision to present the conference, which will take place on Sunday 13 September, as a virtual event comes in light of the Coronavirus pandemic, and opens up the opportunity for delegates to take part that might not have otherwise been able to due to travel restrictions.

“Virtual Conference set to Explore Global Animal-Assisted Interventions Developments and Practices.“

This year’s event explores the concept of human and animal welfare in the field of Animal-Assisted Interventions (AAI) and will have an international flavour. An inspirational keynote address from Dr Brinda Jegatheesan from the University of Washington, USA will provide a global overview of current issues, before we hear state-of-the-art presentations from leading practitioners about AAI practices and research developments.

SCAS Chair, Dr Elizabeth Ormerod, said: “Over the past 50 years AAI has become a popular feature in many health, social care and educational settings. As AAI continues to develop into a beneficial approach for psychologists, therapists, and other practitioners, this event will provide valuable insights into key issues such as animal welfare, client safety, zoonoses, hygiene and standards of practice”.

There will also the opportunity to submit an abstract for poster presentation. Perhaps you have carried out research in AAI and want to share your findings? Or you may be an AAI practitioner and want to inspire others with your work? More information is available on the SCAS website.

The registration fee is £60 with discounts for SCAS members. For more information or to book a place visit http://www.scas.org.uk/2020-scas-virtual-conference/.

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