AI Wearable developed to monitor heart failure

Service Engineering

Researchers from the VA Salt Lake City Health Care System and the University of Utah Health developed a wearable AI sensor for patients which can be utilised by doctors to provide early warning of likely heart failure and monitor a patient's heart. In addition, the researchers claim that the wearable could help eliminate up to one-third of readmissions, soon after the hospital's initial release.

The wearable was examined on one-hundred different heart failure patients, with an average age of sixty-eight, from four separate hospitals. Once the patients were released, they wore the wearable for up to three months, each day for twenty-four hours, and the sensor monitored each individual's motion and electrocardiogram.

“Researchers from the VA Salt Lake City Health Care System and the University of Utah Health developed a wearable AI sensor for patients which can be utilised by doctors to provide early warning of likely heart failure and monitor a patient's heart.“

Once the sensor obtained the information, it was transferred to a smartphone via Bluetooth, from here it was passed onto PhysIQ's analytics platform, which received heart rhythm, heart rate, respiratory rate, sleep, posture, body and walking. The analytics from the AI established a normal baseline for each patient and the platform generated an indication that the patient's heart failure was getting worse when the data differed from normal.

On the whole, the system accurately predicted the need for hospitalisation more than eighty per cent of the time. The study was published in Circulation: Heart Failure journal.

Lead author of the study, Josef Stehlik, stated: “This study shows that we can accurately predict the likelihood of hospitalisation for heart failure deterioration well before doctors and patients know that something is wrong. There’s a high risk for readmission in the ninety days after initial discharge. If we can decrease this readmission rate through monitoring and early intervention, that’s a big advance. We’re hoping even in patients who might be readmitted that their stays are shorter and the overall quality of their lives will be better with the help of this technology.”

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