Risk of diabetes raised with small sugary drink increase over time

Dental

Researchers assessing the link between an increase in the consumption of sugary beverages over time and the potential risk of type II diabetes have identified that consuming an extra 100ml of sugary drinks over a period of four years raises the risk of getting type II diabetes by nearly 16%. Data from 35,000 men and 160,000 women was used in the study which also showed that the risk of getting type II diabetes fell by around 10% in those who switched to tea, coffee and/or water.

“Risk of diabetes raised with small sugary drink increase over time“

Oral Health Foundation CEO, Dr Nigel Carter, said: “This study will hopefully remind people of the importance of cutting down our sugary drink consumption. Just swapping a sugary drink for a tooth-friendly alternative such as water or milk once a day will not only help your mouth health but also slash your diabetes risk. As consumers it’s very important that we take responsibility for what we’re putting in our mouths. That means that we should all be checking the labels of the foods and drinks we buy to make sure that we’re sticking within the recommended daily limit of 30 grams of added sugar a day.”

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